andrewcferguson

writer, performer, musician, wine drinker

Monthly Archives: September 2013

More News from Nowhere (well, from the esteemed Mr Lamont, actually)

What attracted you to the idea of a Nick Cave covers night?

– it was the chance to do a duet on Henry Lee with a friend ( but not, thankfully, recreating the video!)

How did you come to choose your set? Was it your favourite Cave songs of all time, the ones you reckoned were most playable, or a mixture of both?

 

 

– probably my favourite songs and the ones I thought I could deliver; I don’t have the voice for the likes of Tupelo

Cave uses some pretty interesting instrumentation at times. Did that inspire you to change things up from your usual sound?

 

 

– I believe my keyboard player has some tricks up his sleeve

Any particular challenges in rehearsal? Were there any songs you had to leave on the cutting room floor?

 

 

– when we started rehearsal I had a bad cold and my voice was a good bit lower. It sounded great. Now I’m back to normal and I’m struggling to reach the low notes!

Have you something special up your sleeve for your performance, or would you have to kill us after you tell us?

 

 

– the songs speak for themselves so we’re just going to deliver them and get out the way

Finally, do you have any particular Nick Cave anecdotes you’d like to share, either from one of his gigs or otherwise?

 

 

– somewhere I saw Toyah Willcox mention that Nick had brought his kids to her panto performance in Brighton and was to be seen laughing and singing, waving a foam pointy hand and definitely being an off-duty prince of darkness

 

norman lamont

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The Week of Cave Begins

To celebrate the start of Nick Cave week, an invention of my own which culminates, of course, with Cry of the Cave People on Saturday 5th October at the Citrus, here’s a short interview with Kenny Mackay, lead guitarist of Isaac Brutal and the Trailer Trash Express:
What attracted you to the idea of a Nick Cave covers night?
Some bloke asked us in a pub.  [ACF note: that was me.] Seemed like a good idea at the time! [ACF note: it seemed like a good idea to him even after the first pint!]

How did you come to choose your set? Was it your favourite Cave songs of all time, the ones you reckoned were most playable, or a mixture of both?

Most of the band have absolutely no interest in Nick Cave.  It was a case of a) can we play it, b) can the non-Cave acolytes pick it up relatively quickly and painlessly and c) would we absolutely not fuck it up!

Cave uses some pretty interesting instrumentation at times. Did that inspire you to change things up from your usual sound?

No.  We’ve already got a mandolin player!

Any particular challenges in rehearsal? Were there any songs you had to leave on the cutting room floor?

There She Goes My Beautiful World.  It was totally unsingable.  There was also a plan to have a go at Something’s Gotten Hold Of My Heart, but that never got anywhere.  And Sonny’s Burning would probably been a step too far for our drummer!

Have you something special up your sleeve for your performance, or would you have to kill us after you tell us?

Two of the songs don’t have a guitar solo.  That’s groundbreaking for us!

Finally, do you have any particular Nick Cave anecdotes you’d like to share, either from one of his gigs or otherwise?

First time I saw Nick Cave was when the Birthday Party played the Nite Club in 1981.  Those were the days when we had an Edinburgh Rock Festival and Richard Strange had brought his Cabaret Futura club up to Edinburgh for a week.  Great gig.  Strange was the support for all the bands and he was on great form too.  The second time I saw Nick Cave was in Cockburn Street the next day, with Rowland S Howard and (my memory likes to pretend) the paunchy cowboy himself, Tracy Pew!  But I suspect it was just Phil Calvert!  Either way no one paid them the slightest attention because no one knew who they were!
band image

The Autumn Forecast: Slamming, Caving, Tattie Howking, and Fast Bowling

Keats may have said autumn was a season of mists and mellow fruitfulness, but then he never lived in Scotland when it can be a constant diet of monsoons, high winds, crops rotting in  fields, and the inevitable heavy drinking. Keats almost definitely didn’t meet Nick Cave either.

Which is a roundabout way of saying the next few weeks are going to be a bit busy. First off, I’ll need to prepare for Slam Factor Fife, which is bringing the gentle art of the poetry slam to the Magic Kingdom. It’s at the newly reopened Kirkcaldy Galleries on Thursday, 3rd October.

On Saturday 5th, of course, there’s Cry of the Cave People, a celebration of the work of Nick Cave. Four bands, three spoken worders, one night of Gothic magic. Much rehearsal has already been had, and trading of song titles … the Cave People’s FB event page is now open for business.

In the midst of all this, I hope to blow the lid on my latest expose: how the Potato Famine of 1847-8 changed the face of fast bowling forever, or The Scots-Irish Conspiracy Theory of Cricket. You heard it here first.